These are the books we've read with a small review for each of them. Some of them do not have a review because we just got them or we want them (see wish lists). If you'd like to buy the book, I've checked Amazon to see which books are currently available and which ones are not.

The ones that are available have a "Buy From Amazon" link next to them. Enjoy!

Mommy, Why is There a Server in the House? show More info


Essential Thinkers - Socrates (Collector's Library) show More info


The Easter Story show More info

Reviewed Date: 07 November, 2006

Reviewed by: Anthony

Anthony's Rating: Stars-5

Summary:

This is a great introduction to The Easter Story for very small children. Benjamin loves to hear this story over and over, as children do. He brings it to us and has us read it very frequently. It's a cardboard book with brightly colored pictures. The story is very simple, yet true to the Bible. It has a simple application at the end that is salvivic, albeit simplistic, which is ideal for very small children.


Learning to Trust (Daring Disciples) Leader's Guide show More info

Reviewed Date: 06 November, 2006

Reviewed by: Anthony

Anthony's Rating: Stars-3

Summary:

This is the leader's guide to Learning to Trust. Our small group decided to split each chapter between each member so that we all had a chance to lead during this seriese. At least in our group, most people's impression about the leader's guide was rather low. It acted as more of a distraction than a help. The people who had the best time with it simply read the chapter through and picked a couple things to read when we all got together, rather than use it as an actual guide. This seems like false advertising, but there's nothing that says a leader's guide needs to guide the group. It's a guide to the book, not teaching. Take it for what it's worth.


NetBeans: The Definitive Guide show More info

Reviewed Date: 22 October, 2004

Reviewed by: Anthony

Anthony's Rating: Stars-4

Summary:

Let's see. Shall I spend $3000 on Borland's JBuilder, Enterprise Edition? Or shall I spend zero on NetBeans?

This guide is a little dated. At the time of writing this little book review, NetBeans is at version 3.5.1. This book is written when NetBeans was 3.3 or so. And by the end of the year, NetBeans 4.0 might go to beta. And that version is supposed to have a major face lift, so the screen shots in this book will be very out of date.

Expect to spend about 3 weeks of heavy usage getting used to NetBeans with or without this book. But it's time well spent. NetBeans does everything you need and then some. And it's about the only usable Java IDE for Mac OS X when the processor is less than 800 MHz.

For that matter, the last version of Borland's JBuilder to even load on Mac OS X was JB 7. And it was painfully slow to use on my TiBook (667MHz). NetBeans is so useful on my TiBook, I do everything in it. You can't lose.

The book covers everything you need to know about starting a project in NetBeans or working on the NetBeans project itself. Worth it, even as out of date as it is.


Radical Reformission: Reaching Out Without Selling Out show More info

Reviewed Date: 21 July, 2004

Reviewed by: Anthony

Anthony's Rating: Stars-5

Summary:

This book is written by a friend of mine's pastor. The name of the church is Mars Hill Church in Seattle, WA. Well written, and on the edge of the cultural norms. Prepare to be offended.


How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth show More info

Reviewed Date: 16 July, 2003

Reviewed by: Anthony

Anthony's Rating: Stars-5

Summary:

The primary task of Bible study is to determine what the Scriptures meant at the time they were written and how that meaning applies to us today. This vital guide focuses on the historical contexts of the Bible and explains differences between the Old Testament narratives, the Epistles, Gospels, Parables, Psalms and more. It's a practical approach to Bible study -- one that makes good sense and is easy to understand. This new edition includes, among other changes, a new section on the Song of Songs and an updated list of recommended commentaries and resources.


Wild at Heart: Discovering the Secret of a Man's Soul show More info

Reviewed Date: 16 July, 2003

Reviewed by: Anthony

Anthony's Rating: Stars-5

Summary:

If Christian men are going to change from a pitiful, wimpy bunch of "really nice guys" to men who are made in the image of God, they must reexamine their preconceptions about who God is and recover their true "wild" hearts, writes bestselling author John Eldredge in Wild at Heart: Discovering a Life of Passion, Freedom, and Adventure. Eldredge throws down the gauntlet--men are bored; they fear risk, they refuse to pay attention to their deepest desires. He challenges Christian men to return to authentic masculinity without resorting to a "macho man" mentality. Men often seek validation in venues such as work, or in the conquest of women, Eldredge observes. He urges men to take time out and come to grips with the "secret longings" of their hearts. Although the book succeeds best in its slant toward a male audience, it also strives to help women understand the implications of authentic masculinity in their relationships with men. Eldredge frames the book around his outdoor experiences and appealing anecdotes about his family, sprinkling the text with touches of humor and overlying everything with heartfelt passion. Even as he mixes eclectic ideas about masculinity from popular movies such as Braveheart with classic words from Oswald Chambers, and lyrics from the Dixie Chicks with stories from the Bible, he points to only one answer for men searching for their true wildness of heart. Writes Eldredge, "The only way to live in this adventure ... with all its danger and unpredictability and immensely high stakes ... is in an ongoing, intimate relationship with God." --Cindy Crosby


Complete Java 2 Certification Study Guide (3rd Edition) show More info

Reviewed Date: 11 July, 2003

Reviewed by: Anthony

Anthony's Rating: Stars-5

Summary:

I am currently in the process of reading this edition of the Complete Java 2 Certification Study Guide. So far, it's great review, but nothing jumps out at me as different. But if you've never purchaced one of these and you're looking to certify, this books is probably the best. I say probably becasue I have not ready it completely. But I was pretty happy with the 2nd edition, and you can't buy it anymore. So this is the best bet.


Mac OS X for Java Geeks show More info

Reviewed Date: 11 July, 2003

Reviewed by: Anthony

Anthony's Rating: not rated

Summary:

I have not read this book yet, so don't hold me to it. I'm planning on buying it, and I've heard good things. For instance, this weblog entry by Eitan Suez. No stars because I have not read it yet. So please don't take my word for it.